ENEWS: May, 2003 (Vol. 7 #8)

SMHP smhp at UCLA.EDU
Wed Apr 30 17:41:40 PDT 2003


ENEWS: A Monthly Forum for Sharing and Interchange

May, 2003 (Vol. 7 #8)

      Source: UCLA SCHOOL MENTAL HEALTH PROJECT/
           CENTER FOR MENTAL HEALTH IN SCHOOLS

WHAT IS ENEWS? (For those who don't know) This is another link for those
concerned with enhancing policies, programs, and practices related to
addressing
barriers to student learning and to promoting mental health in schools.  It
augments the other ways our Center shares information and facilitates
interchange/networking.

      <><><><><><><><><><><><><>
      Feel Free to Forward This to Anyone
      <><><><><><><><><><><><><>

WHAT'S HERE THIS MONTH

**Emerging Issue
      >Backlash to High School Exit Exams

**News from Around the Country

**This Month's Focus for Schools to Address Barriers to Student Learning
      >May Planning for Successful Transitions to a New Grade or a New School

**Recent Publications Relevant to
      >Children's Mental and Physical Health
      >Family, Community & Schools
      >Policy, Law, Finances & Statistics

**Upcoming Initiatives, Conferences, Workshops

**Calls for Grant Proposals, Presentations, and Papers

**News from the two National Centers focusing on Mental Health in Schools

**Other Helpful Resources

**Requests/Information/Comments/Questions from the Field

**Training & Job Opportunities
      (Including fellowships and scholarships)

<><><><><><><><><><>
To post messages to ENEWS, E-mail them to smhp at ucla.edu

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**EMERGING ISSUE

 >>>Backlash to High School Exit Exams

Report in the Los Angeles Times (4/9/03): "The Los Angeles Unified School
Board voted unanimously Tuesday to oppose the state's requirement that students
pass an exit exam before graduating from high school . . . . More than 100,000
teenagers have failed the California High School Exit Exam at least twice and
must retake it."  Proponents of exit exams warned that "dropping the test would
not help struggling students in the long run because the exam's content is not
unreasonably difficult . . . ."  Those concerned about the psychosocial
consequences of such testing argue that more is at stake than whether
students can
assimilate enough content to pass the exam; they point to likely increases in
dropout rates, mental health problems, and related problems as being ignored by
advocates of high stakes testing.

Where do you stand on this? We look forward to your comments.

Post your response directly on our website's Net Exchange page for others
to read
and respond.
Go to http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu
Or you can send your response by email to: smhp at ucla.edu
                     Phone: 310/825-3634 Fax: 310/206-8716
Write: Center for Mental Health in Schools
Department of Psychology, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1563

@#@#@#@#@#@#@

**NEWS FROM AROUND THE COUNTRY

FEELING TRAPPED BY ACCOUNTABILITY

Indiana State Board of Education reluctantly agreed to revise the state's
accountability system to comply with No Child Left Behind Act, despite Board
concern that 80 to 95 percent of schools could be considered failing. "We feel
very trapped and backed into a corner by this situation, said a Board member.
http://www.nclb.gov/next/overview/index.html


GAO CALLS FOR REDUCING NUMBER OF CHILDREN PLACED IN
CHILD WELFARE & JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEMS SOLELY FOR MH
SERVICES

An April (2003) GAO Congressional report calls on federal agencies to play a
stronger role in reducing the number of children who are being placed
solely for
purposes of obtaining MH services. The report states: "Child welfare
directors in
19 states and juvenile justice officials in 30 counties estimated that in
fiscal year
2001 parents place over 12,700 children into child welfare or juvenile justice
systems so that these children could receive mental health services.
...officials said
most are male, adolescent, often have multiple problems, and many exhibit
behaviors that threaten the safety of themselves and others." GAO recommends
developing an interagency working group to identify the causes of the
problem at
state and local levels and create an action plan to address the causes.
(http://www.ijac.org/pdf/childwelfare.pdf)


PREVALENCE OF CHILD DELINQUENCY

According to the latest statistics, children younger than 13 are involved
in almost
one in ten juvenile arrests related to arson, sex offenses, and vandalism.
http://www.ncjrs.org/pdffiles1/ojjdp/193411.pdf


GROUPING HIGH-RISK YOUTH FOR PREVENTION MAY HARM MORE
THAN HELP

A January (2003) report from the National Institute on Drug Abuse cites the
work
of Tom Dishion and his colleagues who found that youth at high risk for
substance abuse and increasingly serious delinquency were grouped together
for a
12-week cognitive behavioral program designed to reduce problems behavior
actually increased teacher reported delinquency over three years. These youth
exhibited significantly worse behaviors than similarly at risk youths who were
given prevention materials to study by themselves individually or received no
intervention at all. The results are consistent with a number of studies on
negative
peer dynamics within high risk youth groups. Dishion describes the method by
which peers negatively influence on another as "deviancy training."  Not all
interventions with peer groups have adverse effects. Data also exist that
indicate
peer interventions may result in beneficial effects, especially when the groups
include prosocial youth.
http://www.drugabuse.gov/NIDA_Notes/NNVol17N5/Grouping.html


EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT: AN EFFECTIVE ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

An analysis by the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis argues that most
initiatives funded by state and local government to create new jobs result
in few
public benefits, but dollars invested in early childhood yield
extraordinary public
returns. http://minneapolisfed.org/pubs/fedgaz/03-03/earlychild.cfm


NEW SURVEY ON PREKINDERGARTEN IN U.S. PUBLIC ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS

Thirty-five percent of all public elementary schools offer prekindergarten
classes.
Renewed attention on early education to promote school readiness focused on
role
public schools might
play.  (Http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2003019)


SURGEON GENERAL TO VISIT 50 SCHOOLS IN 50 STATES

U.S. Surgeon General Richard Carmona will talk with students about the
importance of making healthy choices and risk avoidance and how making the
right decisions can benefit a student now and later in life.
Http://www.surgeongeneral.gov.


NEW TASK FORCE ON RURAL EDUCATION

Recognizing the unique challenges rural school districts face, the U.S.
Department
of Education has formed a task force to work with the Rural Caucus to find
solutions. Http://www.ed.gov.


DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD VOTES TO OPPOSE STATE EXIT EXAM

As noted in this month's "Emerging Issue, the Los Angeles School Board voted
unanimously to oppose the state's exit exam requirement. Across the state, more
than 100,000 students have failed the exam; pass rates for white and Asian
students are nearly double those of Latinos and African Americans; among
students from low-income homes, only 22% passed the exam's math section,
while about 40% of non-economically disadvantaged students passed (April 9,
2003 Los Angeles Times)


INTERNATIONAL COMPARISONS OF STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT

Fourth graders in the U.S. score better in reading than students in 23 of
the 34
other countries participating in the Progress in International Reading Literacy
Study, although they score lower than students in England, the Netherlands, and
Sweden. Http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2003073


HIGH COST OF TEACHER TURNOVER

What does it cost school districts to replace teachers leaving the
profession?  A
study of teacher turnover in Texas estimates that when wages, benefits,
organization costs related to termination, recruitment and hiring, substitute
salaries, learning curve loss, and training are added up, it costs $56,115
to replace
a teacher who leaves the system. Statewide, the estimate that teacher turnover
costs Texas schools from $329 million per year to $l.59 billion.
Http://www.ascd.org/publications/researchbrief/volume1/v1n8.html.

[Note: see our website What's New, for a current news item posted each week.]

@#@#@#@#@#@#
"School is not easy and it is not for the most part very much fun, but
then, if you
are very lucky, you may find a teacher...My three had this in common   they all
loved what they were doing.  They did not tell   they catalyzed a burning
desire to
know. Under their influence, the horizons sprung wide and fear went away
and the
unknown became knowable.  But most important of all, the truth, that dangerous
stuff, became beautiful and very precious..."
                                         John Steinbeck
@@@@@@@


THIS MONTH'S FOCUS FOR SCHOOLS TO ADDRESS BARRIERS TO
LEARNING

Each month on our website we feature a special focus on enhancing student
support at schools.

May's topic is "Planning for Successful Transitions to a New Grade or a New
School."

As the traditional school year draws to a close, anticipation of a move to
the next
grade or to middle or high school can raise concerns for a student and
family. For
tools, guidelines and resource to support transitions, see the Center's
home page
and click on "Ideas for Enhancing Support at Your School This Month"
(http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"We hear . . . they are laying off all these first-year teachers. ...
I think I came into the profession at the wrong time."
      Sarah Kenley, graduate student in education
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

**RECENT PUBLICATIONS (IN PRINT AND ON THE WEB)

      >>>CHILDREN'S MENTAL AND PHYSICAL HEALTH

"Differences in the use of a school mental health program in secondary
schools."
(2003) by C Fertman & J. Ross. American Journal of Health Behavior 27(2) 146-
155.

"Youth suicide risk and prevention interventions: A review of the past 10 years
(2003) by M Gould, et al. Journal of the American Academy of Child and
Adolescent Psychiatry 42(4) 386-405.

"Receipt of Psychological or Emotional Counseling by Suicidal Adolescents"
(2003) J. Pirkis, et al. Pediatrics, 111(4) 388-393.

"Science-Based Prevention Programs and Principles 2002: Effective Substance
Abuse and Mental Health Programs for Every Community" (2003)
http://ncadi.samhsa.gov/govpubs/BKD479/BKD479.pdf

"Educating the Child with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder" (2003) S.
Rief. Primary Psychiatric 10(4) 61-65.
Http://www.primarypsychiatry.com/issue.php3?volume=10&number=4

"Use of Psychotropic Medications in Young, Preschool Children: Primum Non
Nocere" (2003) W. Barbaresi. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine,
157(2) 121-123. (Http://archpedi.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/short/157/2/121

"Ethnic Matching of Clients and Clinicians and Use of Mental Health Services by
Ethnic Minority Clients" (2003) by S. Ziguras, et al. Psychiatric Services,
54, 535-
541.

"Screening and Assessing Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders among
Youth in the Juvenile Justice System" (2003) T. Grisso & L. Underwood.
National Center for Mental Health and Juvenile Justice. Http://www.ncmhjj.com.

"Assessing the effectiveness of care for youth with severe emotional
disturbances:
Is there agreement between popular outcome measures?" (2002) A Rosenblatt &
J. Rosenblatt. Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research 29(3) 259-273.
Summarized at http://rtckids.fmhi.usf.edu/rtcpubs/datatrends/summary_76.pdf

"Building a Strong Foundation: Creating a Health Agenda for the Middle
Childhood Years" (2003) M Biehl, et al. http://youth.ucsf.edu/policycenter.

"New medical records privacy rule: The interface with teen access to
confidential
care" (2003) by C. Dailard. The Guttmacher Report on Public Policy 6(1) 6-7.


      >>>>FAMILY, COMMUNITY & SCHOOLS

"Special Issue: Evidence-Based Interventions in School Psychology: The State of
the Art and Future Directions" (2003) School Psychology Quarterly, 17(4).

"Safe and Secure: Guides to Creating Safer Schools" (2003) Northwest Regional
Education Laboratory, http://www.safetyzone.org/safe_secure.html

"Neighborhood-Based Prevention/Intervention: A Process Evaluation of a Risk-
Focused Approach" (2003) P. Jenkins & W. Welsh. Children and Youth Services
Review, 25(4) 327-351.

"Relationship between bullying and violence among U.S. Youth" (2003) T.
Nansel, et al. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, 157(4) 348-353.

"Task Force on Community Preventive Services" (2003) Recommendations to
promote healthy social environments. American Journal of Preventive Medicine
24 (3S) 21-24.

"Altering the Structure and Culture of American Public Schools" (2003) W.
Wilms. Phi Delta Kappan. Http://www.pdkintl.org/kappan/k0304wil.htm

"The Agony of School Reform: Race, Class, and the Elusive Search for Social
Justice" (2003) Z. Leonardo, Educational Researcher, 32, 37-43.


      >>>POLICY, LAW, FINANCES & STATISTICS

"Funding Mental Health Services for Youth in the Juvenile Justice System:
Challenges and Opportunities" (2003) B. Kamradt.  National Center for Mental
Health and Juvenile Justice. Http://www.ncmhjj.com.

"Factors that Explain How Policy Makers Distribute Resources to Mental Health
Services" (2003) by P. Corrigan & A. Watson.  Psychiatric Services 54;
501-507.

"Are American Children's Problems Still Getting Worse? A 23 year comparison"
(2003) by T. Achenbach, et al.  Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology 31(1)
1-11.

"Teen Pregnancy: Policy's Role in Prevention" (2003) Center for Health
Improvement. Http://www.centerforhealthimprovement.org/pdf/TEEN_BRF1.pdf

"Datapoints: Trends by Race and Gender in Suicide Attempts Among U.S.
Adolescents, 1991-2001. (2003) S. Joe & S. Marcus. Psychiatric Services,
54; 454.

"Risk and Resilience in the Life Course: Implications for Interventions and
Social
Policies" (2003) by I. Schoon & J. Bynner.  Journal of Youth Studies, 6(1)
21-31.

"Children's Services Tracking: Understanding Multiple Service Use of at Risk
Children through Technology. (2003) R. Brown, et al. Children and Youth
Services Review, 25 (3) 225-249.

"Whole school reform and preschool education: The role of preschool education
in policy decisions regarding the improvement of disadvantaged school systems"
(2003) E. Walker. Journal of Children and Poverty, 9(1) 71-88.

"Status and Trends in the Education of Hispanics" (2003) National Center for
Education Statistics.  http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2003008

"School Choice: Silver Bullet, Social Threat, or Sound Policy?" (2003) by F.
Fowler. Educational Researcher, 32(2) 33-39.

"Schools' Use of Assessment for Kindergarten Entrance and Placement: 1998-
1999" (2003) http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2003004.

"Using the Right Words Gets the Message to Opinion Leaders About Helping
Low-Income Families" (2003) by M. Mellman and S. Munger.  National Center
for Children in Poverty. Http://www.nccp.org/news/win03/win03_02.html

[Note: the Quick Find topic search menu on our website is updated regularly
with
new reports and publications such as those listed above.  Currently there
are over
100 topics with direct links to our Center materials and to other online
resources
and related Centers. Http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu]

`````````````````````````
Money is better than poverty, if only for financial reasons.
                          Woody Allen
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

**UPCOMING INITIATIVES, CONFERENCES, WORKSHOPS

 >National Coordinating Committee on School Health, May 15-16, Washington,
DC http://www.healthystudents.org

 >Linking Forces: Annual Children's Mental Health Conference, May 22 - 23,
Miami, FL   http://sednet.dadeschools,net

 >Interprofessional Collaboration 2003, June 13-14, James Madison University,
Harrisonburg, VA http://www.hhs.jmu.edu/ipc_flyer.pdf

 >National Assembly on School Based Health Care, June 26-28, Reston, VA
http://www.nasbhc.org

 >National Association of School Nurses, June 28-July 1, Cincinnati, OH
http://www.nasn.org

 >American School Counselor Association, June 29-July 2, St. Louis, MO
http://www.schoolcounselor.org

 >Educating Minds and Hearts: Safe Schools, Healthy Character Development,
Academic Success, and Social-Emotional Education, July 8 - 11 NY, NY
http://www.csee.net/conferences/mindsandhearts/evaluationreport.asp

 >National Prevention Symposium, July 16-18, San Francisco, CA
http://www.chef.org

 >National Prevention Network Research Conference, August 24-27, Albuquerque,
NM scarlson at ou.edu

 >International Conference on Trauma, Attachment and Dissociation, September
12 - 14, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia http://www.delphicentre.com.au

[FOR MORE CONFERENCE ANNOUNCEMENTS, REFER TO OUR
WEBSITE AT http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu   Go to "Contents" then click on
Upcoming Conferences]

If you want your conference listed, send the information to smhp at ucla.edu

@@@@@@@@@@@

To lose one parent may be regarded as a misfortune;
to lose both looks like carelessness.
                     Oscar Wilde

      @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

^ ^ ^ ^ CALLS FOR GRANT PROPOSALS, PRESENTATIONS, AND PAPERS

GRANTS:
      >>>Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
      (http://samhsa.gov)
 >Strengthening Access and Retention for Substance Abuse Treatment,
TI-03-006, due May 12
 >Effective Adolescent Alcohol and Drug Abuse Treatment; Motivational
Enhancement Therapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, TI 03-007, Due May 12
 >Methamphetamine and inhalant prevention interventions or infrastructure
development    (part of the Targeted Capacity Expansion Program) SP 03-006,
Due May 23
 >Knowledge Dissemination Conference Grants, PA 03-002, Deadline September 10
      >>>U. S. Department of Education (http://www.ed.gov)
 >Comprehensive School Reform Quality Initiatives, CFDA#84.332B, Due May 5
 >Early Childhood Educator Professional Development Program CFDA #84.349A,
due May 16
 >Smaller Learning Communities Program, CFDA#84.215L, Due May 19

 >>>U.S. Dept. of Justice, Office of Community Oriented Policing Services
      COPS in Schools: School Resource Officers. Deadline June 13
           (http://www.cops.usdoj.gov

[Note: If you want to "Surf the Internet for Funds" go to
Http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu. Click on Quick Find, Scroll down Center Responses
to FINANCING AND FUNDING. Provides links to funding sources and our
Quick Training Aid on Financing Strategies to Address Barriers to Learning]

REQUESTS FOR PRESENTATIONS & PAPERS:
 >National Association of Secondary School Principals Convention, Feb 27-Mar 1,
2004, Orlando, FL. Call for Presentations on successful research based
information on student achievement or principal leadership. Proposals due
May 5.
(Http://www.nasspconvention.org/2004convention.htm)

 >The journal "Reading & Writing Quarterly: Overcoming Learning Difficulties"
is soliciting manuscripts for its column"Focus on Inclusion." The column
provides
a forum for discussing ways to make mainstream education work for students with
learning problems. Manuscripts must be no more than six pages, double spaced.
For more info, contact Michael Skinner (skinnerm at cofc.edu)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"If everything's coming your way, you're in the wrong lane."
           ~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 >>NEWS FROM THE TWO NATIONAL CENTERS FOCUSING ON
MENTAL HEALTH IN SCHOOLS

  ^ ^ ^ Updates from our Center at UCLA

 >SUMMITS INITIATIVE: NEW DIRECTIONS FOR STUDENT
SUPPORT   OUTREACH CAMPAIGN BEGINS

As part of the Summits Initiative, we have developed a nationwide outreach
campaign. The outreach is designed to build awareness regarding:
 >Why it is imperative to pursue New Directions for Student Support
 >Ways to Rethink Use of Resources (Programs, Personnel, etc.)

Special mailings are being sent to Superintendents, Title I Coordinators,
Student
Support Directors, and Special Education Directors at state and district levels
across the country. (For a copy of the outreach material, click on the
Summits on
New Directions icon on the Center website home page). If there is someone you
want sent the info, let us know.


At the same time, invitations are going out to key leaders for student/learning
support to attend the Middle States Regional Summit in Chicago on May 23rd.
Nominations of appropriate participants are welcome, as are recommendations for
organizing State Summits. (See guidelines for state Summits on the Center's
website Summits' link).

The American School Health Association is the latest organization to join
as a co-
sponsor of this important endeavor. Other organizations interested in co-
sponsoring the Summits Initiative are invited to contact us.


 >NEW RESOURCE MATERIALS

The Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, SafetyZone, has developed a
series of eight guidebooks intended to build a foundation of information
that will
assist schools and school districts in developing safe learning environments.
Guide 7 was developed by our Center. It is entitled: "Fostering School, Family,
and Community Involvement." This Guide provides an overview of the nature and
scope of collaboration, explores barriers to effectively working together, and
discusses the processes of establishing and sustaining the work. All eight
guide
are downloadable at http://www.safetyzone.org/safe_secure.html and also are
available in CD format.


 >THIS MONTH'S IDEAS FOR ENHANCING SUPPORT AT YOUR
SCHOOL

Each month we compile ideas and activities to support students, families, and
staff that fit the "season" or rhythm of the school year.  The focus for May is
"Planning for Successful Transitions to a New Grade or a New School." This
monthly website feature and other tools, guidelines and resources to support
transitions can be accessed at http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu.


 >CENTER IMPACT EVALUATION

Thanks to all who responded. Data are being analyzed and a report will soon be
put online.


LET US KNOW WHAT YOU NEED.  New resources can be developed and best
practices identified.  Also, let us know about the latest and greatest you
encounter
so we can update our resources and your colleagues across the nation.

Contact us at SCHOOL MENTAL HEALTH PROJECT/
CENTER FOR MENTAL HEALTH IN SCHOOLS
UCLA Department of Psychology

Los Angeles, CA 90095-1563
Phone (310) 825-3634   Fax (310) 206-8716
Email: smhp at ucla.edu
Website: http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu


^ ^ ^ UPDATES FROM OUR SISTER CENTER

The Center for School Mental Health Assistance at the University of Maryland at
Baltimore will hold its 8th National Conference on Advancing School Based
Mental Health Programs, October 23-25, Portland, OR

The Center has circulated its impact evaluation questionnaire and has
placed the
form on their website to facilitate consumer response.

See their website (http://csmha.umaryland.edu) Or contact Mark Weist, Director,
Center for School Mental Health Assistance, University of Maryland at
Baltimore,
Department of Psychiatry, 680 W. Lexington St., 10th fl. Baltimore, MD 21201.
Phone (888) 706-0980; Email: csmha at umpsy.umaryland.edu


+   +   +   +   OTHER HELPFUL RESOURCES

 >>MENTAL HEALTH/SUBSTANCE ABUSE/HEALTH

"Parents Guide for Talking with their Children About War", National Center for
Children Exposed to Violence, Yale Child Study Center (http://www.nccev.org)

"Grouping High-Risk Youth for Prevention May Harm More Than Help"
http://www.drugabuse.gov/NIDA_Notes/NNVol17N5/Grouping.html

"Spanish-Language Health Resources knowledge path" , Maternal and Child
Health Library, http://www.mchlibrary.info/KnowledgePaths/kp_spanish.html

"Helping your child become a responsible citizen" (English and Spanish) U.S.
Department of Education  http://www.ed/gov/pubs/parents/hyc.html

Prevention Portfolio: a series of three publications to guide community leaders
and policy makers:
      >The Power of Prevention; an resource on long term cost effective
prevention programs
      >Prevention Strategies that Work; promoting healthy life style choices
      >Prevention Programs in Action; exemplary programs from states and
communities
      http://www.HealthierUS.gov/steps

"America's Adolescents: Are They Healthy?" (2003 revised and updated edition)
and Updated Fact Sheets on Adolescent demographics, mortality, substance use,
suicide, unintentional injury and violence.. National Adolescent Health
Information Center. http://youth.ucsf.edu/nahic/products.html

 >>>PARENTS, SCHOOLS & COMMUNITIES

"Closing the Achievement Gap: Lagging Achievement of Disadvantaged Students
Remains a Critical Problem" Education Commission of the States
http://www.ecs.org/clearinghouse/43/00/4300.pdf

"Stateline outlines the impact of state budget crisis on communities and
governors
efforts to maintain essential services like health care and education."
http://www.stateline.org

"Guidance for Homeless Students under No Child Left Behind Act" U. S.
Department of Education.
http://www.ed.gov/PressReleases/04-2003/04082003.html

"Education Policy Advisors' Network" National League of Cities' Institute on
Youth, Education, and Families. To create a policy infrastructure that will
increase the exchange of information and ideas. Http://www.nlc.org

"Tribal Youth Program Web Page", Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency
Prevention Web site.  Http://ojjdp.ncjrs.org/typ/

"Early Childhood Education Fact Sheets" Communications Consortium Media
Center.  Http://www.earlycare.org

"From the Margins to the Mainstream: How can school systems take advantage of
breakthrough possibilities offered by emerging, powerful learning environments
inside and outside of the school building, school day, and school year?"
Http://www.jff.org

[Note: for access to a wide range of relevant websites, see our "Gateway to a
World of Resources" http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu]

@@@@@@@@@@@@

"Warning: Dates in calendar are closer than they appear"

      @@@@@@@@@@@


**REQUESTS/INFO/COMMENTS/QUESTIONS FROM THE FIELD

 >>Reactions to last month's emerging issue: Reducing Over-identification of
IDEA Kids

"While it's easy to understand that fiscal personnel would propose such a
solution, the needs of children are not addressed in this approach.  Since many
children's problems are reactive to environmental circumstances (poor and/or
mis-targeted instruction, ineffective classroom management, etc.) the onus
should
be placed on schools to understand and address these issues in a systematic
way."

"My first question about this issue is where did 12% come from?  How did
legislatures arrive at this as the magic number?  The "Real" World
percentage of
people with disabilities is about 20%, why would schools be different?"

"The greatest need in this area is for an improved definition of ADHD and a
more
rigorous application of that.  There are far too many neurologically normal
children who are given the ADHD diagnosis without adequate support. Many of
the misdiagnosed have aversive temperaments, adjustment problems, depression,
sleep deprivation, malnutrition, homes that are in turmoil, etc.  These
children
have problems but not disabilities. The diagnosis should be given to no
more than
1-2% of children, not the huge number up to 17%.  (I recently heard from a
teacher at a prominent private school that 40% of their children are on
Ritalin)..."


 >>Request to showcase the Policymaker Partnership for Implementing IDEA at
the National Association of State Directors of Special Education "Seed"
Grants to
States:

These grants are intended to promote the initiative launched with National
Association of State Mental Health Programs Directors as cosponsor: "Mental
Health, Schools, and Families Working Together for All Children and Youth:
Toward a Shared Agenda"
 >Missouri: Focus groups across the state regarding the shared agenda to
discuss durable cross-system partnerships.
 >Ohio: State wide kickoff meeting to be followed by six regional
forums.  A synthesized plan to be presented at State House Hearing.
 >Oregon: Three symposia to focus on intensive treatment pilot for SED
students
 >South Carolina: Developing a pilot project in an underserved rural
community to increase role of parents as advocates in schools in order to
increase mental health services in schools.
 >Texas: Technical assistance to regional sites following a statewide
telecast. Gol is to synthesize a state plan from the regional sites.
 >Vermont: State Shared Agenda Task Force is working with higher ed on
workforce development for early childhood mental health professionals.

If you are interested in more information on this initiative, contact Diane
Oglesby
at dianeo at nasdse.org

~~~~~~~~~~~~
"Vision without action is merely a dream.  Action without vision just
passes the
time.  Vision with action can change the world."
           Joel Arthur Barker
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

^   ^   ^   TRAINING AND JOB OPPORTUNITIES

<Internship Director>
Clinical psychologist/internship director for Children's Intervention Program.
Riverbend Community Mental Health, Concord, NH.
Http://www.riverbendcmhc.org

<Director>
Institute for Nonprofit Education, Research, and Engagement, College of
Humanities and Social Sciences, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC.
Qualifications include experience with administration and with the nonprofit
section; advanced degree in humanities, social or behavior sciences,
business or
public administration, or law. Send letter of interest, resume, and list of
references
to James Svara, Chair, Search Committee, NC State University, POB 8101,
Raleigh, NC 27695-8101.

<Director>
Director of Evaluation and Research, Children's Hospital Neighborhood
Partnerships, Department of Psychiatry, Children's Hospital Boston.
Qualifications include doctorate in psychology or related field with
interests in
training in school or community-based mental health. Contact Caroline Watts at
Caroline.watts at uch.harvard.edu

<Research Analyst>
Center for Health Improvement, an independent, not-for-profit, prevention-
focused health policy center in Sacramento, CA.  Need master's degree in public
health or related field and five years experience in health policy. Submit
resume to
Pamela Jones at pjones at centerforhealthimprovement.org

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES, SEE
http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu. Go to Contents, scroll down to Jobs. Following the
listing of current openings, you will see links to HRSA, SAMHSA, and other
relevant job sites.]

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THIS IS THE END OF THIS ISSUE OF ENEWS
Below is a brief description of our Center at UCLA for more see our website
http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu
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Who are we?
Under the auspices of the School Mental Health Project in the Department of
Psychology at UCLA we established a Center for Mental Health in Schools in
1995. The Project and Center are co-directed by Howard Adelman and Linda
Taylor. The UCLA Center is one of two national centers funded in October, 1995,
by the Office of Adolescent Health, Maternal and Child Health Bureau (Title V,
Social Security Act), Health Resources and Services Administration (Project
#U93MC00175). Both Centers were refunded in October, 2000, for a 5 year cycle,
with Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's Center for
Mental Health Services joining HRSA as a co-funder. As sister Centers, the
Center at UCLA and the one at the University of Maryland provide support
(training and technical assistance) for mental health and psychosocial
concerns in
schools.

Our group at UCLA approaches mental health concerns from the broad
perspective of addressing barriers to learning and promoting healthy
development.
Activities include gathering and disseminating information, materials,
development, direct assistance, and facilitating networking and exchanges of
ideas. We demonstrate the catalytic use of technical assistance, internet,
publications, resource materials, and regional and national meetings to
stimulate
interest in program and systemic change. Specific attention is given to
policies
and strategies that can (a) counter fragmentation and enhance collaboration
between school and community programs, and (b) counter the marginalization of
mental health in schools. Center staff are involved in model development and
implementation, training and technical assistance, and policy analysis. We
focus
on interventions that range from systems for healthy development and problem
prevention through treatment for severe problems and stress the importance of
school improvement and systemic change. There is an emphasis on enhancing
collaborative activity that braids together school and community resources.
The Center works to enhance network building for program expansion and
systemic change and does catalytic training to stimulate interest in such
activity.
We connect with major initiatives of foundations, associations,
governmental, and
school and mental health departments. Evaluations indicate the Center has had
considerable impact in strengthening the network of professionals advancing the
field of mental health in schools and in changing policies and practices.

For more information about the Center or about ENEWS, contact
Center Coordinator Perry Nelson or
Center Co-Directors Howard Adelman and Linda Taylor at:
UCLA, School Mental Health Project/Center for Mental Health in Schools
Box 951563 Los Angeles, CA 90095-1563
Phone (310) 825-3634 Fax (310) 206-8716
email: smhp at ucla.edu -- Website: http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu


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